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Good Morning Vietnam!

Good Morning Vietnam!

By Paul Anel          April 13, 2012

Reading Time: 2 min

I know, Vietnam sounds like a bad word, but it is not quite as bad as it sounds… not anymore. Let's make it clear: yes, communists still run the country. But times are changing, as Bob would say. The Regime is divided and on the brink of a schism: while the old-timers, those who hold fast to the torch of ideology and proudly look back at the 70's, are now carrying the weight of their own eighties, a new and more liberal generation of politicians increasingly occupy the scene…

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Fukushima, the Virgin and the Dragon: an artist’s journey through fire to redemption

Fukushima, the Virgin and the Dragon: an artist’s journey through fire to redemption

by Paul Anel          March 2, 2012

In this exclusive interview for landofcompassion.com, NY based artist Pierre Fichefeux tells us the story behind his painting "The Kiss," and how the peaceful landscape he had first depicted took an expected turn on March 11, 2011, when a tragedy of extreme violence hit Japan . . . Layer after layer, a drama unfolds, and new characters come on stage: the Virgin, a dragon, three monkeys and the city dwellers become part of a story of suffering and redemption.

 

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“I am not afraid to live” – The art of reversing thoughts

“I am not afraid to live” – The art of reversing thoughts

by Nicole Zeimis          February 24, 2012

The Fun-A-Day Project & Show started eight years ago in Philadelphia. It was founded by an organization called The Artclash Collective, and has now spread around the world with events in the United Kingdom, Canada, and various locations across the United States. I moved to Philadelphia in June, and started hearing about Fun-A-Day in December when my housemates picked up the event postcard and tacked it to the refrigerator.

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High and Low – A review of Leonard Cohen’s “Old Ideas”

High and Low – A review of Leonard Cohen’s “Old Ideas”

by East Eden          February 17, 2012

If you know nothing about him, the first entrance of his voice on his 2012 album ‘Old Ideas’, will tell you that Leonard Cohen is more than a musician. One phrase, spoken onto the record like God himself, an inch from the microphone, tells you our narrator is a storyteller; a storyteller who doesn’t tell stories from a distance – other than the distance of time. Our subject has been a poet, a drinker, a family man, a freight hopper, maybe even a dancer with a cigarette making smoke circles in a rundown dorm room at McGill University- where he studied law, poetry and debate.

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The “Arctic Cross” Project: a journey into Orthodox Alaska

The “Arctic Cross” Project: a journey into Orthodox Alaska

by Paul Anel          February 10, 2012

In this exclusive interview for Land of Compassion, filmmaker Dmitry Trakovsky (Meeting Andrei Tarkovsky) shares some of the amazing discoveries he made as he embarked on a voyage down the murky waters of the Kuskokwim and Yukon Rivers of southwestern Alaska, to the native homeland of the Yup’ik people. Prepare yourself for a few surprises, watch the trailer of this feature-length documentary project, and support it on Kickstarter!

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Reconsidering Solzhenitsyn (1/3) – The End of Western Civilization?

Reconsidering Solzhenitsyn (1/3) – The End of Western Civilization?

by Paul Anel          February 10, 2012

Fifty years ago A day in the life of Ivan Denissovitch was published. It was the first novel from a man who devoted his life – and his work – to saving the soul of his people from the snare of materialism: Aleksander Solzhenitsyn (1918-2008). In the coming weeks, LoC will celebrate the Russian writer with a series of three articles. Today, LoC offers you selected excerpts from the commencement speech given by the Nobel Price recipient in 1978, at Harvard. This speech, probably one of the most memorable ever delivered at this prestigious university, was tagged “infamous” by the press, and owed Solzhenitsyn violent criticisms. 33 years later however, the writer’s prophesies have come all too true. They shed a rare light on the present confusion. It’s high time to reconsider Solzhenitsyn, and to carefully listen to his words. Words full of truth. A bitter truth, one might say. But, as he himself put it in his introduction, isn’t that a friend’s responsibility to tell the truth to his friend?

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